Menu
Western Australia / Australia

Pinnacles desert – The desert with the mysterious limestone players

Pinnacles desert is just outside Cervantes, approximately 20 miles north of Perth in Western Australia. The desert is not particularly large, but it is not the size of the desert that attracts visitors to the national park. There is a geological mystery here. Out of the golden sand, thousands of limestone pillars stretch up towards the sky. The pillars are up to 4 meters high and vary in yellow, orange and creamy white. Like great termite mounds in a golden sea, where waves of sand reshape the desert every day. Some pillars disappear under the sand. Others appear.

Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia

The mysterious desert

The pillars in the Pinnacles are believed to have formed between 30.000 and 40.000 years ago. However, the researchers are not entirely agreed on how. There are an incredible number of theories, but none of the theories feel entirely credible. The most popular theory is that remnants of shells have blown here from the sea. Through many, many years of rain, the lime in the seashells has formed lime deposits under the sand. The plants' roots have caused the lime in the ground to crack and when the area's climate changed, the soil eroded and the sand surrounding the lime deposits disappeared. Left over the Pinnacles. The desert that feels like the roof of an upside-down limestone cave.

Pinnacles desert - Australia

The Pinnacles is located in Numbung National Park. Numbung roughly means "crooked" and is an old word from Australia's indigenous people. "Crooked" is an appropriate word for the park's winter rivers, which throughout the ages have been important to the nomadic tribes that lived in the area. Strangely enough, you can't see traces of people for the last 6000 years in the Pinnacles. In fact, there is no real documentation of this unique desert until as late as the 1960s. How could you have missed this place for so many years? One theory is that the pillars were hidden under the sand for thousands of years.

Pinnacles desert - Australia

The desert at sunrise and sunset

We stayed one night in Cervantes and therefore had the opportunity to go to the Pinnacles both to experience the sunset and to hike in the morning sun. The advantage of traveling in Western Australia during the winter months is that the temperature stays at a wonderfully warm level even during the day. It rarely gets either too hot or too cold to hike. Perfect for t-shirt and a hoodie. However, the sunset was an experience that I am extra happy to experience. As the winter sun cast its long shadows over the limestone columns and the sky turned pink, they almost felt like they were on another planet. One of the most beautiful experiences of the trip.

Our rental car - Pinnacles desert - Australia

Attractions in the Pinnacles

The vast majority of people who come here to Pinnacles drive "the Pinnacles Drive" - ​​a 4 kilometer long sand road through the desert. The road is fully drivable with a normal car in dry conditions, although most people (including ourselves) drove 4WD. The road is one-way and the edges are marked by limestone.

There is also an easy 1,2 kilometer long excellent hiking trail through the area, which takes you to some of the park's most beautiful spots. If you can plan your visit, be sure to schedule this short hike. It's a great way to get off the road and see the desert a little more secluded.

Pinnacles desert - Australia

How do I get here?

The Pinnacles are 2 miles south of Cervantes in Western Australia and is easily accessed via the Indian Ocean drive off-ramp. Stop at the Pinnacles Desert Discovery Center before heading out into the park. Here you can learn about the area's history and wildlife through stylish exhibitions.

Map (opens in Google maps)

How much does it cost to visit the park?

Visiting Numbung National Park alone costs AUD 15 per car. However, we bought a very convenient Holiday Pass for 4 weeks for 60 AUD, which covers entry to most of the parks in Western Australia. You can buy the pass at most of the national parks' visitor centers, or you can buy it online and print it.

Pinnacles desert - Australia

Do you want to read more about the Pinnacles and Western Australia?

Want to read more of my travel tips? do not forget to like Rucksack on Facebook!

Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Park center - Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Road - Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Pinnacles desert - Australia
Want to read more from Western Australia?
About the blogger

Travel blogger, gastronaut, photographer and family adventurer with over 55 countries in his luggage. Eva loves trips that include beautiful nature, hiking boots and well-cooked food. On the travel blog Rucksack she takes you to all corners of the world with the help of her inspiring pictures and texts.

6 Comments

  • Eve / Live like Eve
    7 September, 2019 at 20: 46

    Wow, nice pictures!

    Reply
    • Eva Gyllenberg
      7 September, 2019 at 20: 48

      Thank you Eva! ??? It was a dream to walk here with the camera at sunset. So delicious!

  • Maria's memoirs
    8 September, 2019 at 7: 36

    Wonderful pictures and such a wonderful place it must be at sunset ❤️ Thank you so much for the link too?

    Reply
    • Eva Gyllenberg
      10 September, 2019 at 16: 25

      Thank you Maria, too bad you missed the sunset! The whole sky turned pink and the shadows were so long so long. But nice in daylight too!

  • Inger Hanson
    8 September, 2019 at 21: 39

    Cool!

    Reply
    • Eva Gyllenberg
      10 September, 2019 at 16: 23

      It sure is? ? Love the mystery of nature, is a little refreshing not to understand everything in the world! (I say that as an engineer...)

write a comment