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Recipe: Gyoza

When we travel around Asia, we always try to find a really good dumpling/gyoza/dim sum place. Din Tai Fung is our favorite – a Taiwanese chain found all over Asia, but also in the US and Australia. Here at home in Sweden, I haven't found a really good place so far, so I've learned to make my own. This is our favorite Gyoza recipe, but we vary the ingredients according to what we have at home. Firm tofu+Shitake, shrimp or chicken - replace the minced pork with what you think suits best. However, I personally think that pork gyoza is usually the juiciest.

Filling
200 grams of finely grated collard greens or white cabbage
200 grams of minced pork
2 finely chopped shallots (also works with spring onions)
1 large clove of garlic
2 tsp grated fresh ginger
1 tablespoon cornstarch or potato flour
1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 tbsp Japanese soy
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tbsp sake (can be omitted)
1/2 teaspoon salt
fresh coriander - finely chopped
you
40 thawed gyoza leaves (buy frozen, ready-made, round)
Not necessary, but good: Gyoza mold (see picture)
Dipping sauce
4 tsp rice vinegar or Mirin
4 teaspoons of Japanese soy
1 tsp sesame oil
toasted sesame seeds
chili flakes or fresh chili
fresh coriander
grated ginger (to taste)

DO THIS:

1) Mix all the ingredients for the filling in a large bowl.

2) Take one of the gyoza sheets and place the flouriest side down

3) Take a tablespoon and form an oval lump of the filling. Put the middle on the gyoza sheet.

4) Dip a food brush in a little water and gently wet the edge of the gyoza leaf all the way around.

5) Fold the gyoza in half and press out any air. Make sure all edges are pressed together properly.

6) Place the gyoza on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cover with aluminum foil or a baking sheet.

7) Repeat until all gyoza are done.

8) Mix the dipping sauce. Feel free to make one bowl per person so that everyone does not have to dip into the same bowl.

9) Take out your best frying iron. Preferably a Teflon iron without damage. If the gyoza sticks, it breaks.

10) Heat up the iron (7 out of 9 on our stove) and put some sesame oil in the bottom of the iron.

11) Take each gyoza, rub the bottom in sesame oil and place them in the iron. Our iron holds 10 pieces at a time.

12) Let the gyoza fry until they get a little color. Once browned, pour a few tablespoons of water into the pan and quickly toss on a lid.

13) Let the gyoza steam under the lid for a few minutes until all the water is gone.

14) Lift onto a serving plate and cover to keep warm while you cook for 10 more.

15) When everyone is ready: Serve the wonders and enjoy!

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About the blogger

Travel blogger, gastronaut, photographer and family adventurer with over 55 countries in his luggage. Eva loves trips that include beautiful nature, hiking boots and well-cooked food. On the travel blog Rucksack she takes you to all corners of the world with the help of her inspiring pictures and texts.

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